Computable Minds

Blog of popular science about the more exiting branches of computer science.

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Sorted by "Less negative votes"

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274

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29

Posted on: Nov, 12th 2010
WiFi logo with bones behind
Neither me nor anyone knows if the radiations of WiFi networks and mobiles are bad to the health. There are an infinity of scientific studies about the effects of the electromagnetic non-ionizing radiations in the health, the fifty percent says that there are not evidences that prove that exists adverse effects, and the other fifty percent assert that there are. Deep in "Are WiFi Networks healthy? (II)"

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428

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21

Posted on: Nov, 5th 2010
A Bigfoot Hard Disk below a hard disk of standard size
Did you question some time what is faster, a big hard disk or one little?. Normally, the hard disk to desktop computers have 3'5 inches and the laptops have 2'5. This suppose any advantage? Read more of "Hard Disk: the size is important"

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735

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27

Posted on: Oct, 1st 2010
Phosphorus of a CRT screen
The screensavers, theoretically, serve to protect the monitors from the deterioration of the quality of the screen produced when you leave an image fixed during a lot of time. With the abandon of the CRT monitors in favor of the TFT-LCD, the screensavers leave of be useful, but a lot of people follow believing that still serve to save the screen. Surprise yourself with the rest of "Screensavers. Save they my screen?"

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268

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72

Posted on: Aug, 24th 2010
CAPTCHA
The web pages increasingly receive more SPAM of programs that automatically fill the forms of the webs. To avoid it, appears the annoying CAPTCHA ("Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart"). A CAPTCHA consist in a test that has to pass the person that is filling the form, to demonstrate that is a human. But, are there any test that can surpass a human and not a machine? Follow reading "Could the CAPTCHA of the future distinguish a human from a machine?"

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230

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12

Posted on: Jun, 22nd 2010
Procesador
At the prior post we saw how the computers are every time more fast due to the increase of density of the transistors linked to its continuous size reduction. By one hand, the augment of transistor allow make more operations by second, and by the other hand, decrease its size allows enhance the clock frequency, but this second way of optimization was stalled at 2003. See why. Follow discovering "Ghz: Why are stalled? "

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826

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13

Posted on: Jun, 18th 2010
Gordon Moore’s photo
Gordon Moore, one of the Intel founders, published in a magazine of 1965 a "law" known as Moore's Law, that tells: "the number of transistor of a processor doubles every 24 month". Can be interpreted as: "every two years the processors are twice fast at the same price". That "law" it's satisfied every year, but, Will stop at sometime? Continue reading "Moore's Law: In two years your new computer will be obsolete"
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